Book news, Cover to Cover

Cover to Cover | Turtles All The Way Down

Look what’s making a comeback in 2018! oh yeah cover to cover baby

This time I decided we’d check out some cool covers of this book that’s been going around the internet lately and you might wanna check out my review here as well

The English Edition

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The classic cover that tends to grab your attention straight away because of that bright orange spiral but also because they wanna make sure John Green’s name stands out haha. It’s one of those simple but effective covers

The German Edition

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This cover keeps true to the spiral theme but this time we have actual turtles! The blue pattern in the background is also pretty cool and gives it this abstract feel

The Portugese Edition

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I love love love the shade of orange they’ve used on this cover. The cute drawing of the diner which holds significance in the novel is lovely too

The Swedish Edition

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A lot going on in this cover but it seems like they’ve literally taken buzz words out of the novel and illustrated them to create a cover. Pretty cool tho

The Polish edition

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This one is a little bit different to the rest. I actually really like the artwork, not sure how much it holds true to the novel but yeah nice

 

Book news, Book reviews

Book Review | Turtles All The Way Down

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I feel like John Green always delivers a unique addition to the coming of age genre. This wasn’t my favourite book ever or anything but like any other John Green book, it left its mark

The protagonist Aza is unlike anything I’ve ever read before. Right from the beginning the reader can tell that a lot of research and meticulation went into creating this character with all these problems. She almost felt too flawed at times but maybe that was the point. This book allows you to get inside the head of someone who is literally struggling with their mental health on a cellular level. It’s not an easy task to put yourself in someone’s shoes so deeply and Green does that beautifully.

In terms of the plot itself, while the mysterious disappearance does attract you at the beginning, you soon realise that it is not the main attraction of this novel. I think the message Green was trying to send across by making the mystery secondary was that in real life mysteries aren’t all that grand. This isn’t a dramatic thriller novel after all. It does however, work as an element of intrigue throughout the whole novel.

In comparison to Aza the rest of the characters felt quite flat, like they were placeholders. I really didn’t feel the overwhelming romance shining through. I did however, enjoy the perspective that the novel gives you. I mean you’re always going from being close to Aza on a cellular level to zooming out and seeing the story as a whole.